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Tuesday, May 20

  1. page Watson BG Group 1 edited {immigrant-loop.gif} Colonial Immigration/Migration In America Between 1790-1820 By Tristan, …
    {immigrant-loop.gif}
    Colonial Immigration/Migration In America Between 1790-1820
    By Tristan, Tara, Sarah,
    ...
    and Nyill.
    Overview of Immigration
    by Tristan
    Between 1790-1820 people all over Western Europe and other small countries came to the United States to either escape country problems or pursue a better life by achieving a higher paid job. America was receiving the most immigrants in the world. During this time period 85,000 Africans came to America along with 50,000 Scot-Irish, 45,000 English, 40,000 French, 25,000 Germans, and 25,000 Irish (The Peopling of America). America was 3.9 million people at the time, still gradually populating (The Impact of Immigration on American Society: Looking Backward to the Future.).
    A few major groups left their countries of certain problems. The Irish left their country because of the corrupt English rule over Ireland. The French left because of the Revolution happening in France. Soon, the immigration rate slowed down. Wars in Western Europe slowed the pace of immigrating. The U.S. banned anyone from bringing slaves to the country in 1808 (Immigration). The war with Great Britain and the US had also slowed immigration. Later, In 1812 peace had re-established and people were now coming to America from Great Britain, Ireland, and most of Western Europe(The Impact of Immigration on American Society: Looking Backward to the Future).

    Causes of Immigrantion
    by Erica&Tara
    ...
    Hirschman, Charles. "The Impact of Immigration on American Society: Looking Backward to the Future." July 28, 2006 5. 10 Nov 2008 <http://borderbattles.ssrc.org/Hirschman/>.
    Heidler, David S., and Jeanne T. Heidler. Daily Life in the Early American Republic, 1790-1820. Greenwood Publishing Group.
    ...
    Nov 2008
    <http://lcweb2.loc.gov/learn/features/immig/african.html>.
    ...
    Nov 2008
    <http://lcweb2.loc.gov/learn/features/immig/german.html>
    "Immigration Irish." Immigration. 5/7/07. Library of congress. 14 Nov 2008 <http://lcweb2.loc.gov/learn/features/immig/irish2.html>.
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    11:23 pm

Wednesday, September 2

Tuesday, December 9

  1. page Heritage Project Help edited ... As a starter page on Native American history: http://www.lib.washington.edu/subject/history/t…
    ...
    As a starter page on Native American history:
    http://www.lib.washington.edu/subject/history/tm/native.html
    Works Cited:
    Dodson, Howard, ed. "The Great Migration." AAME. AAME. 12 Nov. 2008 <http://www.inmotionaame.org/migrations/landing.cfm?migration=8
    -"The Peopling of America." Ellis Island. Ellis Island Foundation Inc. 12 Nov. 2008 <http://www.ellisisland.org/immexp/wseix_5_3.asp>.
    -Smith, S. E. "What was the Asian Exclusion Act?" Wisegeek. 2003. 14 Nov. 2008 <http://www.wisegeek.com/what-was-the-asian-exclusion-act.htm>
    -Harris, Heidi. "Mormon Perceptions of Asian Race, 1880-1930 (Part II:Japanese and Conclusion)." Juvenile Instructor. 24 June 2008. Juvenile ---Instructor. 12 Nov. 2008 <http://www.juvenileinstructor.org/mormon-perceptions-of-asian-race-1880-1930-part-iijapanese-and-conclusion/>.
    -"German Immigration." Emuseam @ Minnesota State University. Mnsu. 11 Nov. 2008 <http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/history/mnstatehistory/german_migration.html>.
    -Smith, S. E. "What was the Asian Exclusion Act?" Wisegeek. 2003. 14 Nov. 2008 <http://www.wisegeek.com/what-was-the-asian-exclusion-act.htm>

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    10:14 am

Monday, November 24

  1. page Watson BG Group 3 edited ... force restrictions on japanese immigrants and Japan would not let any further immigrants emigr…
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    force restrictions on japanese immigrants and Japan would not let any further immigrants emigrate to the U.S.
    Migration Within America
    {040324_dust_bowl_04.jpg} DUstDust Bowl Storm
    In 1930 America underwent one of the largest migrations of of all time in America. From 1930 to about 1940 America's Great Planes were the victims of major ecological and agricultural damage called the Dust Bowl causing hundreds of thousands of people to leave their farms and move westward (wikipedia). Dirt would rain down out of the sky and whole cars or farming machinery would be covered (humanities) People would just pick up and leave just take what the needed and head out of town. Not only this but its also when the Great Depression started so things were hard and with everyone moving from the Great Planes westward there was a low economy due to the stock market crash of 1929 and very limited job opportunities. SO when these migrants arrived at their destination there wasn't much
    to be excited for.
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    2:35 pm

Thursday, November 20

  1. page Watson AE Group 3 edited ... {Jewish_immigration_2.jpg} The greatest wave of Jewish immigration was between this time per…
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    {Jewish_immigration_2.jpg}
    The greatest wave of Jewish immigration was between this time period, 1880-1930. Jews believed that immigrating to the Americas would be less dangerous than staying in Russia (Main Jewish immigration history America north-east). Why was there danger in Russia? In 1881, emperor of Russia, Alexander II or the Tsar of Russia was assassinated. The Russians blamed the Jews for this cause. His son Alexander III became the next emperor. During Alexander III’s reign, his power grew much and he turned great interest in anti-Semitic (Alexander III of Russia). The Russians and the emperor developed an anti-Semitic policy, discrimination against Jewish people. In addition to this policy, there were also pogroms, organized persecution against the Jews (Jewish Immigration). Jews were either forced out of their homelands or executed (Main Jewish immigration history America north-east). Other than persecutions, the Jews also wanted better education and a happy life in the United States for their next generations. The Jews were also in search of gold and the United States of America Dream (Main Jewish immigration history America north-east ).
    ...
    the United Stares).States). Jews had
    The Great Migration
    by Marcus He and Eduardo Lepe
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    4:03 pm

Wednesday, November 19

  1. page Herko AE Group 5 edited ... == = OVERVIEW = From 1965 until todaythere have been a lot of immigrants coming to the US…
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    ==
    =
    OVERVIEW
    =
    From 1965 until todaythere have been a lot of immigrants coming to the USA from different parts of the world. the type of people who have come into the USA are Irish, Polish, Italians, Jews, Germans and Scandnvians. Many other groups came after, like Asians, Pacific Islanders and Latinos. Immigration is getting harder every year because before people could come and go with lots of money, but now not even with a lot of money would help them. The cause of this is because of the terrorist attack that happen on 9/11. So now people that come in illegaly struggle more than they did in the past. In conclusion, there is a big diversity of people that come to the USA illegaly but its becoming less due to the strickness of the rules. Since 1965 up untill now there has also been migration, that is moving within the USA. During the 1970's people within the USA who migrated it mostly went from the center states into the south. Northerners moved to the west and north central americans to the south and west. 1990-1994 the population in California decreased becasuse of
    of migrants moving
    {266440372_2e4227fb89.jpg} A New Sight For Immigrants
    Liberty Source
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    5:17 pm

Tuesday, November 18

  1. page Herko AE Group 4 edited ... The Austria-Hungarians When fascism took over their government, many Austrian-Hungarians deci…
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    The Austria-Hungarians
    When fascism took over their government, many Austrian-Hungarians decided to migrate to the United States. However, after fascism, communism appeared, and it drove about 40,000 people out of Austria-Hungary and into other areas around the world. For example, one of the countries was United States because of the “Displaced Persons Acts of 1948” which allowed refugees to come into the United States. Besides the “Displaced Person Acts of 1948”, the government developed a new act called “ Refugee Relief Act” which was ratified in 1953 because the act is based on targeting immigrants who are living under the communism rule in the Eastern Europe. After this act was ratified, about 200,000 refugees came over to the United States. The people that arrived in the U.S. were mostly Austrian-Hungarian women because many of them had their husbands over in the U.S. already, so they were reuniting with their husband. With the soviet taking control of the Austria-Hungarian government during the late 40s, many people wanted to seek better job opportunities in the U.S. After the Austria-Hungarian came over to the United States, majority of them decided to settle in Chicago during the1940’s and 1950’s. Many of those new immigrants tries to preserves their old cultures and definitely their native language by practicing in their homes with the next generation.
    The PolishsPolish
    During the time of WWII, many Poland were force to moved out of their country and become refugees because of the rise of Nazism. In addition, many people left Poland because during Holocaust, many Polish Jews were killed so, many were trying to coming over to the U.S. In the beginning of the post war period, many resided along the Western border of Europe, but then later on, the Polish people decided that United States had better opportunities than anywhere else did. This allowed them to be part of the Displaced Persons Acts of 1948 because they have no place to live, so then the U.S. allowed them to come over to the country. This allowed them to be part of the Displaced Persons Acts of 1948 because they have no place to live, so then the U.S. allowed them to come over to the country. When the Polish disembarked onto American soil, many of them first arrived in Ellis Island, and then afterwards, Polish moved to Chicago. The Polish did not manage to get very high paying jobs even in a new environment where most of the new immigrants were educated before they were in America. Nevertheless, they still managed to save a lot of money for future generations. Many Polish were much assimilated to the American culture and eventually pushed away the old culture. Many young ones stop going to there church and retain themselves from believing in anything. And also, many just forgot their own culture and developed into the American culture.
    The Germans
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    10:17 am

Monday, November 17

  1. page Watson BG Group 1 edited ... Hirschman, Charles. "The Impact of Immigration on American Society: Looking Backward to t…
    ...
    Hirschman, Charles. "The Impact of Immigration on American Society: Looking Backward to the Future." July 28, 2006 5. 10 Nov 2008 <http://borderbattles.ssrc.org/Hirschman/>.
    Heidler, David S., and Jeanne T. Heidler. Daily Life in the Early American Republic, 1790-1820. Greenwood Publishing Group.
    "Immigration African." Immigration. 5/7/07. Library of congress. 14 Nov 2008
    <http://lcweb2.loc.gov/learn/features/immig/african.html>.
    "Immigration German." Immigration. 5/7/07. Library of congress. 14 Nov 2008
    <http://lcweb2.loc.gov/learn/features/immig/german.html>
    "Immigration Irish." Immigration. 5/7/07. Library of congress. 14 Nov 2008 <http://lcweb2.loc.gov/learn/features/immig/irish2.html>.

    "Immigration."World Book, Inc.. 2001.
    Immigration." 13 Nov 2008 <http://lcweb2.loc.gov/learn/features/immig/irish.html>.
    "National Immigration Forum." The Journey. 14 Nov 2008 <http://www.takeoutgraphics.com/NIF/pages/1700s.html>.
    No author. "Africans in America." Memory.loc.gov. Sept.-Oct. 2005. Library of Congress. 13 Nov. 2008 <http://memory.loc.gov>.
    No author. "The Immigrants Expoerience." Consulate of Mexico omaho, nebrasko. 11 Nov. 2008 <http://google.com/experiences=immigration>.
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    8:57 pm
  2. page Watson BG Group 1 edited ... The English had the largest population throughout time as they lived in the U.S. However, over…
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    The English had the largest population throughout time as they lived in the U.S. However, over time, African Americans are going to grow a larger population because there are 40,000 more immigrants from that group than the English population. the laws that affected this immigration had to do with the congress. However, the congress could do little to affect this immigration but in order for this kind of immigration to pass, certain laws were required to be passed by the congress. The congress could ban slave trade to have the authority to establish certain laws and rules for naturalization. In 1790, the Congress passed the first Naturalization Act. In 1806,immigration was reduced. The war of 1812 was between the U.S. and Britain. This war slowed immigration even more but peace reestablished in 1814. Immigration resumed from Great Britain, Ireland and western Europe. The port cities were overwhelmed by the new comers. Another law that needed to be constructed by the congress was the Sterage Act that was passed in 1819. African Americans however, had struggles dealing with their slave lives. In 1808, congress bans the importation of slaves, but slavery continues to grow in the United States. The slaves were living a poor and harsh life. They were held in pens most of the time, and were put up for auction often. Their biggest challenge was to survive in this kind of society because they had no authority to make decisions about their own lives.(Africans in America)
    The experiences between American and the immigrant's former country had its similarities and differences. After the immigrants were settled, they started heading out for employment opportunities. Cultural differences were obvious and new residents began to live and work together. Experiences of the immigrants were full for excitement and joy. The immigrants wanted to reach their goal and to live in "the country of choice". their expectations were high. The differences between the culture of their former life and their new life became apparent and shocking. Differences that are in the U.S., is that it is a "do it yourself society. Immigrants that came from another country felt confused when they had to do most things themselves. However, the similarities were that immigrants came to the U.S. to work which they did in their former country. Another value that was similar to them in both places and life styles is the significance of family.(The Immigrants Experience)
    Religion and a becoming of an AmericanJobs
    by Nyill
    ...
    U.S. citizens (National Immigration Forum).
    Different immigrants have many types of religions. German Jews were mostly Hebrew and Yiddish. In their American German communities they stayed with catholics and Lutherans. Since Germans were white their legal status allowed them to be citizens of America. It remained a law to be a resident for more than 2 years to be an official citizen. As far as jobs and money, Germans grew crops and owned farms, in urban areas they worked in factories and industries with trading goods (Immigration German).
    When the Irish came to the Americas, they were mostly poor. As for money the women would become servants for the rich and men would work for coalmines and railroads (Immigration Irish). Irish were both catholic and Irish Prodestants (Mr. Stanton).
    Africans were forced to come to the Americas. As for work, the Africans became slaves. They brought with them farming skills, that involved rice, wheat, fruit orchards, and indigo. Their religion involved statues, music, language, worships, drums, and hand-made architectures (Immigration African).

    Citations
    Hirschman, Charles. "The Impact of Immigration on American Society: Looking Backward to the Future." July 28, 2006 5. 10 Nov 2008 <http://borderbattles.ssrc.org/Hirschman/>.
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